Sunday, September 4, 2016

JE - TU - IL - ELLE

I'm not even sure that I liked it / maybe I can't get over my own discomfort with the weight of the feminine it's got going
but
a man I worked for and respected introduced it, Ackerman was his advisor, he said that she was

"Blessed and cursed by a purity of vision."

Like painful ovulation.



BPL PLASMA sporting reflective, copper windows.
A strip of orange across my throat, taste metal.

Pouille hitting a tennis ball across a court in hot pink tennis shoes.

This. Please read this--

Overcast, still, want what ruptured out of Weil's sickbed:

"Her late thought is also characterized by a complex, almost dialectical structure that must be taken into consideration if she is to be adequately understood. She approaches a problem from both the vantage point of human experience in the world and from the point of view of eternity, and then explores the contradictions that result. Indeed, in her late writing Weil explicitly sees contradictions as a lever which can be used to raise her (our) understanding of a given problem to a higher and more complex level, thereby enlarging and deepening the "composition on many planes" which constitutes one's perception of reality. She is more of a relativist than a casual reading of her works might suggest. although hers is an unusual kind of relativism, anchored in a belief in the existence of absolute truth and in the human need to make representations of that truth. Both Weil herself and her writings embody a paradoxical tension between absolute certainty and a radical openness that is almost a kind of agnosticism: she spoke and wrote with unyielding conviction (she was said never to give way in an argument), but at the same time she was fully aware of the inadequacy of her conceptions to embrace what was by definition beyond her.

"I am absolutely certain," Weil wrote in her Marseilles Notebooks, "that there is a God, in the sense that I am absolutely certain that my love is not illusory. I am absolutely certain that there is not a God, in the sense that I am absolutely certain that there is nothing real which bears a resemblance to what I am able to conceive when I pronounce that name, since I am unable to conceive God--But that thing, which I am unable to conceive, is not an illusion...""

I am so glad she walked the Earth, unwilling to be physically touched.

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